How on Earth am I supposed to understand what philosophers and philosophy students talk about? I don’t get a single thing they say.

That’s the problem with how philosophy education goes.

It starts out exciting; perspectives on every level get challenged and broken to where you realize how little you can actually be certain of.

The basics are epic, and life-changing, and touch on the very core of our unique humanity—our amazing ability to conceptualize.

But then as philosophy advances, practitioners seem proud to merely adopt an elitist language . . . which they then use to write off whole ideas as soon as any aspect of an idea is shown to be questionable.

This process usually occurs to the applause of the smallest possible audience.

But I see such thinking as needlessly binary.

What if all strengths and weaknesses of every related idea could be measured together, at once, without any being discarded?

What if we worked to simplify the language we use to describe our thinking instead of reveling in how complex we can make it?

Sure, we might witness less nerdy mic-drop moments, but I think we’d also get a much clearer, truer, and more accessible picture of reality.

3 thoughts on “How on Earth am I supposed to understand what philosophers and philosophy students talk about? I don’t get a single thing they say.

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